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 •  June 19

Pregnancy is not an illness. Rather, it is the ultimate expression of wellness — creating and carrying new life to fruition. Yet prenatal care in the United States has evolved into a complex regimen of 12 to 14 appointments over the course of a 40-week period, often only to confirm that the expectant mother and her fetus are healthy. Low-risk...

hbr.org

 •  June 15

A decade ago, Kaiser Permanente installed the nation’s most comprehensive electronic health record (EHR). The decision was made by the health plan and medical group together. Due to the large size of our organization, implementation was challenging and expensive: The process took two years, and the cost at the time was estimated to be around $4...

hbr.org

 •  June 1

No industry or sector is immune to hacking. That reality was made painfully clear in mid-May, when a cyberattacker using WannaCry ransomware crippled health care institutions and many other kinds of organizations around the world. In 2015 over 113 million Americans health records were exposed, and in 2016 the number was over 16 million, according...

hbr.org

 •  July 21, 2016

HBR STAFF Have you ever thought about what happens to your employees right before they get to work? Sometimes we all wake up on the wrong side of the bed and just find it hard to get our bearings. At other times, we might start out fine, but have a horrible commute or a screaming match with a teenager just before going to work. Paying attention to...

hbr.org

 •  October 13, 2015

The system for paying health care providers is extremely fragmented. In response, both the United States and the Netherlands are now

hbr.org

 •  October 7, 2015

Health care remains one of the few services that require people ... Pressure to lower costs also bodes well for innovation in telemedicine’s one-to-many model of care delivery. Early results suggest that new payment models that reward providers for ...