Diagnostic Reading #13: Five Must Read Articles from the Past Week

Here are five readings that you may have missed this week. Relationships between physicians and radiologists was a theme this week. The readings include, an examination of the costly problem of unnecessary care, using social media to drive patient engagement, two studies from the Journal of the American College of Radiology, and an article that ...

Carestream logoHere are five readings that you may have missed this week. Relationships between physicians and radiologists was a theme this week. The readings include, an examination of the costly problem of unnecessary care, using social media to drive patient engagement, two studies from the Journal of the American College of Radiology, and an article that tells the story of a new style of healthcare provision.

1) Medical Necessity and Unnecessary Care – the Full Story

This article addresses the costly problem of unnecessary care. According to the author, procedures that are not evidence based account for about 30% of total healthcare costs.

2) Using Social Media for Community Engagement: A Success Story

Social media is growing in just about every industry, healthcare is no different. Read about the benefits that social media use can offer healthcare providers and customers, and how its effective use can be the next step on the journey to encourage patient engagement.

3) Primary Care Doctors Say Imaging Improves Patient Care

An email survey conducted by the Journal of the American College of Radiology found that physicians depend on imaging to find results that are not otherwise available. An impressive percentage of physicians find imaging valuable to their job and that it helps them make better decisions.

4)  Interactive Radiology Reports Preferred by Referring Physicians

Another study by the Journal of the American College of Radiology revealed that physicians see benefits in using interactive radiology reports. The study found interactive reports improved understanding of radiology findings by correlating images to text reports and provided easier access to images while monitoring progression of a disease or condition.

5) ‘Direct Primary Care’ Shown to Please Patients and Reduce Costs, Including for Imaging

Insurance that covers unlimited visits to a primary-care for a monthly fee has proven to pay off in more than one way. While the system has satisfied patients across the board, it also cuts down on imaging and healthcare costs.

 

Source: www.carestream.com